A Greek guide for the book of Luke and a FREEBIE too!

How’s your Greek? I’ve got a book review as well as a freebie that might peak your interest.

Christmas will be here before you know it, and taking the effort to work through the Greek text of the birth narratives in Matthew and Luke might help kickstart a habit that will bless you and your ministry for years to come. And if you need a recommendation to get you started, look no further than the volume on Luke in the Exegetical Guide to the Greek New Testament (EGGNT) series.

In the interest of full disclosure, I asked Broadman and Holman to bring Christmas to me early this year by sending me a review copy, but that’s because I’ve already invested in a few of the other books in the series.

Luke was written by Alan J. Thompson. He’s got strong academic credentials, having studied under Eckhard Schnabel and D.A. Carson. He also has a few academic books on his resume, including an upcoming volume on Acts in the Biblical Theology for Christian Proclamation series.

Like other volumes in the EGGNT series, Luke begins with introductory materials covering authorship, date, audience, and purpose—standard commentary fare—though the extensive outline at the end of the book (five pages, single-spaced) is more of what you would expect from a much larger commentary.

Once you get past the introductory materials, the real fun begins. Because of size limitations (the book is over 400 pages), there’s no full Greek text or English translation. A Greek New Testament or an interlinear necessary to make full use of the book. Thompson works verse-by-verse through the Gospel of Luke, providing comments on grammar, syntax, textual variants, and translation options. It truly is a comprehensive guide to the Greek text of Luke.

Using this and other volumes in the EGGNT series has brought my Greek back from the brink. It had been a couple years, and I had forgotten so much, I wasn’t sure I’d be able to pick it up again. When I saw how helpful one book was, I bought another, and another…

It was a little unwieldy for me at first because of all the abbreviations, but a few visits to the section listing abbreviations, and it didn’t take long to adjust.

Now for the freebie! Rob Plummer does a daily video working through a verse in the Greek New Testament on his website Daily Dose of Greek. Starting November 6 he will begin working through Philemon. As a special incentive, you can download Philemon from the EGGNT on My Word Search Bible, a website from Broadman and Holman for FREE. Check out his post for the details here.

The Lost Sermons of C. H. Spurgeon

Charles Haddon Spurgeon was one of the most influential preachers of the 19th century. At a time before automobiles, airplanes, and electricity, he regularly preached before crowds of more than 5,000 in his church in London (he once even preached before crowd of over 23,000 people). He founded a college, an orphanage, and was a strong advocate for foreign missions. He was personally acquainted with D. L. Moody and Hudson Taylor. Famous Americans like Mark Twain, John D. Rockefeller, and James Garfield (before he became the 20th president of the United States) visited his church to hear him preach. He left more published words than any other Christian in history, before or since. He has often been called the “Prince of Preachers,” and rightly so.

Despite his popularity, or perhaps because of it, Spurgeon received a lot of criticism during his lifetime. His opposition to the new theory from fellow Englishman Charles Darwin earned him mockery from cartoonists and newspapers. His condemnation of so-called Christian slaveholders in America resulted in threats and book burnings throughout the Southern United States, especially from members of the relatively new Southern Baptist denomination. Yet times have changed, and now Southern Baptists are not only among his greatest admirers, but they have begun publishing a planned twelve-volume set of his earliest sermons, never before seen in print.

LifeWay graciously provided me a review copy of The Lost Sermons of C. H. Spurgeon, Volume I. Over a few weeks I read it cover to cover. Volume I contains the 76 sermons Spurgeon recorded in the first of nine notebooks that will serve as the bases for the rest of the volumes in this series. I was immediately impressed by the aesthetic beauty of the book in my hands. The cloth over board covers, sewn binding, thick and glossy pages, and full color facsimiles of each page of the notebook showed a commitment to producing a high-quality work, and this is only the standard edition (there’s a special edition with more photographs, gilded pages, and even a slip cover, too!).

The introductory materials drew me in immediately. A 17-page timeline from 1800-1910 highlights important events from the life of Spurgeon in red and significant moments (both secular and religious) from the 19th century in black. Events of interest to Southern Baptists are included as well. The book also includes chapters looking at Spurgeon’s place in history, his relationship to Southern Baptists, and the background of this book series. Excepts are available online, which I encourage you to check out (from the ForewordEditor’s PrefaceIntroductionpdf sampler).

Each sermon includes a color facsimile, transcription, and notes. Even as a teenager, Spurgeon’s sermons were impressive for his insight and ability to connect with his listeners. He largely used outlines (he called them “skeletons”) and relied on his memory to preach extemporaneously. Because this is a critical work, the notes identify sources Spurgeon used (he was particularly fond of John Gill and John Bunyan), references to events of his day, and quotations from elsewhere in his body of work where he treated the same topics or Scriptures in more detail. The notes also discuss ink marks, corrections, and spelling, but I largely ignored these.

I wish my early sermons were as good as Spurgeon’s. By the time he was 20 he had already preached more than 700 times. If they had only published the text of his notebook, it would have been worth reading. The addition of introductory materials placing Spurgeon in his historical context and scholarly research of the notes placing his sermons in the context of his sources and later writings make the volume even more valuable.

If you’re interested in snagging a copy for yourself, you can find The Lost Sermons of C. H. Spurgeon, Volume I online and in LifeWay stores. Volume II is slated for release in September 2017.

Whether you’re interested in Spurgeon’s lost sermons or not, you can get access to a digital library of over 3,500 of his sermons by signing up for the Broadman & Holman Academic eNewsletter here. It’s free and you can cancel your email subscription anytime.

The Lost Sermons of C. H. Spurgeon

Charles Haddon Spurgeon was one of the most influential preachers of the 19th century. At a time before automobiles, airplanes, and electricity, he regularly preached before crowds of more than 5,000 in his church in London (he once even preached before crowd of over 23,000 people). He founded a college, an orphanage, and was a strong advocate for foreign missions. He was personally acquainted with D. L. Moody and Hudson Taylor. Famous Americans like Mark Twain, John D. Rockefeller, and James Garfield (before he became the 20th president of the United States) visited his church to hear him preach. He left more published words than any other Christian in history, before or since. He has often been called the “Prince of Preachers,” and rightly so.

Despite his popularity, or perhaps because of it, Spurgeon received a lot of criticism during his lifetime. His opposition to the new theory from fellow Englishman Charles Darwin earned him mockery from cartoonists and newspapers. His condemnation of so-called Christian slaveholders in America resulted in threats and book burnings throughout the Southern United States, especially from members of the relatively new Southern Baptist denomination. Yet times have changed, and now Southern Baptists are not only among his greatest admirers, but they have begun publishing a planned twelve-volume set of his earliest sermons, never before seen in print.

LifeWay graciously provided me a review copy of The Lost Sermons of C. H. Spurgeon, Volume I. Over a few weeks I read it cover to cover. Volume I contains the 76 sermons Spurgeon recorded in the first of nine notebooks that will serve as the bases for the rest of the volumes in this series. I was immediately impressed by the aesthetic beauty of the book in my hands. The cloth over board covers, sewn binding, thick and glossy pages, and full color facsimiles of each page of the notebook showed a commitment to producing a high-quality work, and this is only the standard edition (there’s a special edition with more photographs, gilded pages, and even a slip cover, too!).

The introductory materials drew me in immediately. A 17-page timeline from 1800-1910 highlights important events from the life of Spurgeon in red and significant moments (both secular and religious) from the 19th century in black. Events of interest to Southern Baptists are included as well. The book also includes chapters looking at Spurgeon’s place in history, his relationship to Southern Baptists, and the background of this book series. Excepts are available online, which I encourage you to check out (from the ForewordEditor’s PrefaceIntroductionpdf sampler).

Each sermon includes a color facsimile, transcription, and notes. Even as a teenager, Spurgeon’s sermons were impressive for his insight and ability to connect with his listeners. He largely used outlines (he called them “skeletons”) and relied on his memory to preach extemporaneously. Because this is a critical work, the notes identify sources Spurgeon used (he was particularly fond of John Gill and John Bunyan), references to events of his day, and quotations from elsewhere in his body of work where he treated the same topics or Scriptures in more detail. The notes also discuss ink marks, corrections, and spelling, but I largely ignored these.

I wish my early sermons were as good as Spurgeon’s. By the time he was 20 he had already preached more than 700 times. If they had only published the text of his notebook, it would have been worth reading. The addition of introductory materials placing Spurgeon in his historical context and scholarly research of the notes placing his sermons in the context of his sources and later writings make the volume even more valuable.

If you’re interested in snagging a copy for yourself, you can find The Lost Sermons of C. H. Spurgeon, Volume I online and in LifeWay stores. Volume II is slated for release in September 2017.

Whether you’re interested in Spurgeon’s lost sermons or not, you can get access to a digital library of over 3,500 of his sermons by signing up for the Broadman & Holman Academic eNewsletter here. It’s free and you can cancel your email subscription anytime.

Going deeper with New Testament Greek (a book review)

goingdeeperwithgreekI decided to make 2016 the year I would try to pick up my biblical Greek again after a lapse in practicing for a couple years. One of the most helpful resources I’ve found is the 2-4 minute video clips on the Daily Dose of Greek website Robert Plummer, my seminary professor, created a little while ago. He works through a verse or a part of a verse in each video, translating, parsing verbs, and commenting on the grammar. Because the videos are so short, I’m able to refresh my memory and learn new concepts all with a minimal time investment.

I discovered that he had worked on an intermediate Greek grammar that was due to come out in June, so I contacted the publisher and requested a copy of it to review. After carefully working through quite a few chapters, I have to say Going Deeper with New Testament Greek is just the kind of book I needed to help me pick up my Greek and keep using it going forward.

Plummer didn’t write the book by himself. It’s a collaboration of other Greek teachers including Andreas Köstenberger and Benjamin Merkle. Together they’ve produced something that not only teaches, but allows readers to practice what they’re learning as they go. Each chapter is laid out the same way, so by highlighting each chapter’s features, I’ll show you just how useful this book is:

Going Deeper

The authors introduce each chapter with a practical example demonstrating how the subject of the chapter applies to reading and understanding the New Testament. Most of these examples correct errors that I’ve heard (and quite likely propagated at one time or another). Even before I started reading this book I made a commitment to myself not to use the phrase, “In the original Greek this means…” when preaching unless absolutely necessary. Rabbit trail aside, the examples serve as strong reminders that studying these grammatical concepts are important. I particularly liked the discussion about whether the Lord’s Prayer directs us to pray that God would deliver us “from evil” or “from the evil one” and the matter of whether “go” in Matthew 28:19 should be “going” instead.

Chapter Objectives

This gives a brief outline of the chapter.

Body

The bulk of the chapter is dedicated to discussion of its subject matter. The material is broken up into various headings and subheadings for easy navigation. The authors also provide multiple examples to show how these concepts play out in the New Testament. They also interact with other Greek grammars, allowing the reader to understand how these grammatical concepts are addressed by other scholars.

Summary

Readers already familiar with a given concept may benefit from skipping to the Summary at the end of the chapter, which consists of charts and tables condensing the chapter’s material into a handy reference table. I would have liked to see all these tables reprinted at the end of the book as an easy access reference guide, but this is only a minor complaint.

Practice Exercises

Ten exercises are included at the end of each chapter to reinforce the lesson, and most if not all of the verses used come right from the chapter itself. This feature is quite unique, as most grammars either sell a separate workbook or fail to include any exercises whatsoever. I found that if the answer wasn’t forthcoming the Summary charts usually helped me figure it out in no time.

Vocabulary

Even after a couple years of not practicing my Greek, I was still able to recognize by sight or by context most of the words in the sentences that I should have memorized in my beginning Greek classes. Words that appear 50 or more times in the New Testament are included in the back of the book. The vocabulary section at the end of the chapter for the reader to memorize includes words that appear between 15 and 49 times. There are also words appearing less frequently than 15 times to recognize, which comes in handy in the next section.

Reading the New Testament

This was my favorite section. The reader is given a passage of Scripture to read in Greek. The passage has numerous examples of the chapter’s grammatical concept(s), and the uncommon words in the “to recognize” vocabulary section come from the passage, so you don’t need a lexicon to find a definition if you get stuck. After reading the passage, the authors include a verse-by-verse commentary on the grammar and vocabulary of the passage.

I should also point out that the last few chapters provide even more helps for the aspiring Greek student, including resources for continued study, sentence diagramming (a lot more fun than you might think), word studies, and more.

This has been the most helpful resource I’ve worked with so far in picking up my Greek, and I highly recommend it to anyone who wants to stay current with their language skills.

Information on B&H Publishing website
Sample Chapter