Whoa, who saw that coming?

Whoa, who saw that one coming?  Nick Saban’s teams do not catch a beatdown very often.  The Alabama fans didn’t see it coming.  They moaned and wailed every time Clemson scored, and sounded like they were on the Titanic.  (People dying from hypothermia is not funny, but the sounds emanating from my television were akin to the sounds from James Cameron’s epic) Dabo Swinney didn’t see it coming.  Did you see his face at the post game interview?  Guy looked like he just won the powerball jackpot.

Dabo Swinney expressed his love for Jesus Christ and his belief in the sovereignty of God over his life’s trajectory.  He said, “God planned this.  This doesn’t just happen.  God planned all of this.”  What are we to make of Swinney’s acknowledgment of faith?

A friend of mine, whom I respect, suggested Dabo’s Christian joy was an attempt to placate his freshman quarterback who is also a man of faith.  There are three problems with this assertion, and we’ll skip the obvious fact that Trevor Lawrence said nothing about Jesus or God in his on field interview immediately following the game.

First, if Coach Swinney were dead set on pleasing his quarterback, why did he wait until the fifth game of the season to start him?  Lawrence was a high school legend.  It seems the easier way to please him would be with playing time rather than fake faith.

Second, Coach Swinney seems to be the most genuine coach in college football, unless you count Les Miles who said, “Death Valley is where championship dreams come to die.”  The University of Kansas football program got ten times more interesting when they hired Les, but I digress.

Third, who’s to say that Trevor Lawrence couldn’t inspire his football coach to grow closer to God?  I’ve heard Tim Tebow had a positive effect on Urban Meyer.  Why couldn’t Trevor Lawrence have the same effect on Dabo?

How should we react when a coach, or an athlete gives credit to God after a championship win?  I’ll end this post with a few suggestions:

  1. We should evaluate what they’re saying.  Are they pointing to God as their leader, or are they pointing to God as their helper?  Are they acknowledging God for being great or are they telling us that God has made them great.  There’s a big difference.
  2. We should not be jealous.  Let’s face it guys, which one of us would not love to be standing on the podium hoisting the Lombardi trophy or that weird looking National Championship stick?  I like the crystal ball personally, but I hear Alabama broke it.  I’ll be honest.  I would love it, but God did not create me to coach college football.  If I were the head coach at Clemson, we would not be bowl eligible.  We might beat teams like Iowa and Oklahoma, but those would be our lone victories.
  3. We should cut them some slack for two reasons.  First, these guys have just come off winning a championship, and they are amped up.  Second, most of these guys are not seminary trained.  The rampant emotions and the shallow theological understanding combine to make for some uncomfortable statements.  Let’s cut them some slack and look beyond their post-game interviews to how their faith is expressed in their actions.  Many of these coaches and athletes are heavily involved in FCA, their churches, and other Christian organizations.  They’re making a lasting difference in their communities.  Their post-game statements will fade into obscurity, but the tangible impact they’re making on those around them will be their legacy.
  4. How do they react when they lose?  Tim Tebow, after his team lost the SEC Championship game to Alabama said, “to God be the glory”.  I’ve not heard how Tua (I can’t even begin to spell his last name) reacted, but I hope his faith is stronger than one lopsided defeat.  We should pay attention to how these athletes and coaches react when they’re on the wrong end of the score before we make a judgment about the authenticity of their faith.

We need athletes and coaches proclaiming the name of Christ.  They’re going to fail at times (cue the Hugh Freeze comments) but we should be pleased whenever Christ’s name is mentioned.  In Philippians, Paul was faced with those who had ulterior motives for proclaiming the name of Christ.  He responded, “To be sure, some preach Christ out of envy and rivalry, but others out of goodwill.  These preach out of love for the defense of the gospel; the others proclaim Christ out of selfish ambition, not sincerely, thinking that they will cause me trouble in my imprisonment.  What does it matter?  Only that in every way, whether from false motives or true, Christ is proclaimed, and in this I rejoice.  Yes, I will continue to rejoice.”  When we hear Christ’s name proclaimed, let’s rejoice.

Fort Worth Star Telegram Report on Sexual Abuse

The Forth Worth Star Telegram has published a four part series detailing a culture of sexual abuse within the Independent Fundamental Baptist Network.  The series was written by Sara Smith.  She reported on the Paige Patterson situation earlier this year, and, from my research, has been a leading journalist in exposing abuse in religious institutions and denominations.

If you have time, go read the series.  It is scary.  The Star Telegram interviewed over 200 people who were subjected to all kinds of abuse including rape, intimidation, and underage sex.  The perpetrators, in most cases, were never prosecuted, but were quickly shuffled to another church within the network.  This is not the Catholic church, these are our distant cousins and the accusations are coming closer and closer to home.  What should we do?  I have five suggestions:

  1. Pay attention:  The #metoo movement has impacted various personalities within our denomination, not our denomination as a whole.  that doesn’t mean our denomination has no secrets, or that a culture similar to the Fundamentalist Baptist Network cannot develop within our churches, conventions, and associations.  When I was a teenager, our church hired a pastor who had cheated on his wife at three different churches.  When he was discovered having an affair, he would shuffle off to the next church, rinse, and repeat.  We have to pay attention to this issue.  Satan would like nothing more than to catch us off guard.
  2. Be on Guard:  I was reading the report and was amazed at how many of the perpetrators and their enablers were allowed private audiences with underage female church members.  We cannot take that risk.  I know pastors who continue to meet alone with females.  That is never wise, and in today’s culture it’s foolish.  How many stories like this do we need to read before we stop putting ourselves in compromising positions.  We make Satan’s work easy when we take foolish risks.  If you’ve been meeting alone with a female who is not your wife or a family member, cut it out.
  3. Update our policies:  I have a friend who led his church in updating all of their policies concerning sexual abuse allegations.  He also updated various counseling policies for his own protection.  He has set the example for me, and in 2019, I’m going to lead our church to update our policies.  Updating our policies facilitates discussion amongst the rank and file in our pews.  They also protect the accuser, giving them a safe process and outlet to share their accusations, and they protect the accused against false accusations.  We need to update our policies because discussion brings accountability, gets things out in the open, and puts this issue on the radar.  The overwhelming issue with The Fundamentalist Baptist Network, according to the Star-Telegram, is a lack of accountability and a culture of intimidation and silence.
  4. Listen:  When we hear an accusation, we need to listen and take the accuser seriously.  That doesn’t mean we jump to convicting the accused, but The Star Telegram gives details of a shaming culture.  the accusers were shamed into silence, and in several cases, the Bible was used to shame these accusers.
  5. Stay away from the Pedestal: The Fundamentalist Baptists have a pedestal for their pastors.  Their pastors, according to the Star-Telegram report, are seen as next to God.  The wield unquestionable authority. We cannot put our leaders on a pedestal.  I appreciate Dave Miller’s series on criticism.  Earlier this year, our denomination experienced what happens when one of our leaders falls off his pedestal.  We should always feel free to Biblically criticize our leaders.
  6. Communicate:  The Star-Telegram reports a culture of sweeping accusations under the rug, and transferring accused ministers out of state to other churches, often in the same ministry positions, given alleged perpetrators access to underage girls and children.  This can happen in our denomination as well.  It probably has happened.  For example:  a youth minister is accused of improper conduct with one of the youth.  The pastor is informed.  The pastor speaks with the youth minister and determines the accusations are false, but he advises the youth minister to resign.  The pastor, not wanting to ruin the ministry of a dynamic youth minister, recommends him to another church as their youth minister.  Or worse yet, the pastor calls the authorities, and they find the accusations credible, but the youth and her parents do not press charges and the pastor, not wanting to ruin the ministry of a dynamic youth minister, recommends him to another church as their youth minister, and the cycle begins again.  How can we stop this?  There should be a denomination wide group, organization, database where churches report and receive reports about verified incidents of sexual misconduct.  Yes, I said verified, not alleged or rumors.  there has to be something we can do to better communicate with each other.

This report scared me because it had the word Baptist in it.  If you think this kind of culture does not exist in our own denomination, you have your head in the sand.  It exists in our denomination.  It may not be as wide spread as in the Fundamentalist Baptist Network, but it is there.  Sara Smith, and other journalists like her are doing an outstanding investigative job.  They are uncovering a culture of sin, and holding our leaders accountable.  This report and others like it should serve as a warning to us.

John Allen Chau–An Introspective Look

John Allen Chau was martyred while trying to bring the gospel to the Sentinelese people sometime between November 16 and November 19.  There have been numerous stories written about Chau’s martyrdom. Baptist Press wrote this story if you’re not familiar with Chau’s death.

I’d like to take an introspective look at Chau’s martyrdom.  Instead of asking questions about his methodology, we should examine our hearts.  Here are five questions:

 

  • Are we willing to be martyred for Christ?  That’s the obvious question, but it’s a tough question.  Every believer should answer in the affirmative. It’s easy to answer “yes” when sitting in a climate controlled sanctuary, a seminary classroom, or a weekend retreat surrounded by ebullient millennials.  What if Chau had asked us to accompany him? What would we have done? Would we have lectured him on wisdom and prudence, or would we have gotten in the boat with him?
  • What is our responsibility to others?  While I write this post, two sets of eyes are staring at me.  I’m responsible for them, my wife and three other kids. At what point should I be responsible, knowing that my martyrdom would leave a widow and five fatherless children? In 2010, I was preparing to go on a mission trip to Guatemala.  My wife was pregnant with our third child and several well meaning Christians counseled me not to participate because if something happened, my children would be fatherless. I was even told, “There will be time for missions later.” I was horrified and sad.  Jesus had an answer for this question. He was very blunt. He told His followers to hate their families. He used the word hate. We don’t use the word hate around our house, but Jesus unambiguously called us to surrender anything and everything that is valuable to us.  This includes our families. My answer to this question: I’d rather my kids grow up knowing their daddy was a martyr than never knowing the true cost of following Christ. I hope I never have to make that choice.
  • How are we doing in our missions efforts?  There are far too many unreached and uncontacted people groups.  Why aren’t we reaching them? Are we even trying to reach them? After Chau’s death, the Twitterverse was ablaze with disparaging comments, some from pastors and church leaders.  The question is not, should John Chau have gone to that remote island? The question should be, why, in an era of unparalleled technology, was he the first missionary to share the gospel with these people?  Also, why are there still some 3000 plus unreached people groups? We have the most powerful weapon of hope in history. David Platt said at the 2015 Southern Baptist Convention’s Pastors conference, “When will we stop telling the world to go to hell?”  

 

  • When does the gospel override planning and structure?  Do we need structure?  Yes we do. Do we need careful and diligent planning?  Yes we do. But more than planning, structure, and sound methodologies, we need passionate gospel proclaimers.  We need to be passionate gospel proclaimers. The gospel is not beholden to any structure, denomination, or organization.  The gospel and the gospel alone has the power to save. Paul wrote in Romans, “How beautiful are the feet of those who bring the good news.”  John Chau’s feet are beautiful. How do our feet look?

 

  • Will we see a fresh commitment to reach the lost?  There are unreached people groups in the farthest corners of the world, but there are also unreached people in groups in our own towns.  Will we see a fresh commitment from Christians to reach everyone with the gospel of Christ? Or will John Allen Chau’s martyrdom be a cautionary tale in how not to engage a hostile people group?  If John Allen Chau can kayak two miles in the hopes of sharing the gospel with an unknown people, then we should be able to cross the street and engage our neighbors.

 

These are the questions we should be asking ourselves.  It’s easy to play armchair quarterback to what seems, on the surface, to be a fool’s errand, but I like John Allen Chau’s method of evangelizing over and above my method of not evangelizing.  The unequivocal truth is this: A twenty six year old man dared to bring the gospel to a people he was almost certain would kill him if given the chance. He died sharing his faith. Do we even live sharing ours?

Character Matters: George H. W. Bush

George Herbert Walker Bush was the first President I remember.  I was eight years old when he was elected and I remember he beat that guy whose tank helmet was too big for his head.

George Bush was beacon of civility in a cruel profession.  What I have learned about him since his exit from office is the exact opposite of what we see in politics today.  His character was above reproach and his character mattered to him.  Here are some of the highlights:

He was the son of a wealthy Senator, yet chose to serve as a fighter pilot in World War II.  He could have found a place of service in relative safety far behind the front lines, but he chose to be in the thick of the action.  His character was evident at an early age.

He routinely sacrificed politically advantageous and influential positions to serve at the behest of the current President.  He was elected to the House of Representatives, but resigned his seat to serve at the behest of President Nixon.

He formed a lasting friendship with President Bill Clinton in the wake of the 2004 Tsunami and Hurricane Katrina.  His goal was to do what was best for those who had been affected.  He was not there to promote himself.  That’s a man of character.

He also wrote a note to President Clinton as he exited The White House.  Clinton said, “I was touched by his kindness.”  Clinton also stated that President Bush was like the father he never had.  The man who befriends his political adversary who took every opportunity to trash his reputation on the campaign trail is a man of character.

In a documentary about The White House and its most recent occupants, the permanent White House staff all praised President Bush and his wife as decent, kind, caring, and affectionate.  President Bush was known to send personal condolences to White House staffers when they had lost a loved one.  In Colossians 3:12, the Bible says, “Therefore, as God’s chosen people, holy and dearly loved, clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness, and patience.”  President Bush exemplified these traits.

He invited Dana Carvey to perform at The White House.  Dana Carvey regularly President Bush on Saturday Night Live.  I’ve seen the footage of Carvey’s performance at The White House.  The loudest laughter came from the man who was being impersonated.  Who does that?  A man of humility and grace.

He sacrificed his reelection bid to do what was best for the country.  President Clinton won the election because President Bush raised taxes.  It was, in his estimate, what was best for the country.  this self sacrificial move probably prevented our country from sinking farther into the recession of the early 90s and many economists believe, set the stage for the economic boom of the mid to late 90s.

He kicked Sadam Hussein out of Kuwait, but resisted the urge to oust him from power. He made a promise to kick him out of Kuwait, not to remove him from power.  He kept that promise, and two decades later, we can see the wisdom behind that decision.

He kept a low post presidency profile.  He went about the business of serving others after he left The White House.  he did not interfere with political affairs though he had ample opportunity.  He spent 24 years as an ex-president and the enduring images of his post presidency career are those of service to others and Houston Astros ballgames, where he had a seat directly behind home plate.  I’m glad he was able to see them win a World Series.

He was a life long member of the National Rifle Association, a bastion of republican support.  He, however, resigned his membership in 1995 when then President, Wayne LaPierre, mad disparaging statements towards federal law enforcement officers.  That requires a man of character.

When our current President insulted the Bush family during the 2016 election, the Bush family did not retaliate.  The whole family emulated the character of President Bush.

The last time we saw President Bush was a this wife’s funeral in April.  His son was pushing him down the aisle as they exited the church.  He elicited love from every member of his family because he showed that kind of love in return.  This man of character loved his family more than his country.

He was a man who served his country and not himself.  He was a man who was gentle but not a wimp.  He was a man who was humble yet supremely self confident.  He was a man who’s character and reputation mattered more than his politics.

He was a religious man and I believe this kind of character can only come from a man who knows Christ as his Savior.  He loved God by loving others.

Our country lost a statesman, a moderate politician and a philanthropist, but most of all our nation has lost a piece of its character.  He was the last President from the greatest generation, and he was the last President who put character above politics.

Do we really want to make American great again?  American greatness was forged in the fires that tried the souls of great men like President Bush.  American greatness will never be found in a surly tweet, or a snarky quip.  It will always seep forth through the pores of men who prize character above everything else.

The Apostle Paul wrote in Philippians 4:8, “Finally, brothers, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable–if anything is excellent or praiseworthy–think about such things”.  May God make our country great again with more men like George Herbert Walker Bush.