Whoa, who saw that coming?

Whoa, who saw that one coming?  Nick Saban’s teams do not catch a beatdown very often.  The Alabama fans didn’t see it coming.  They moaned and wailed every time Clemson scored, and sounded like they were on the Titanic.  (People dying from hypothermia is not funny, but the sounds emanating from my television were akin to the sounds from James Cameron’s epic) Dabo Swinney didn’t see it coming.  Did you see his face at the post game interview?  Guy looked like he just won the powerball jackpot.

Dabo Swinney expressed his love for Jesus Christ and his belief in the sovereignty of God over his life’s trajectory.  He said, “God planned this.  This doesn’t just happen.  God planned all of this.”  What are we to make of Swinney’s acknowledgment of faith?

A friend of mine, whom I respect, suggested Dabo’s Christian joy was an attempt to placate his freshman quarterback who is also a man of faith.  There are three problems with this assertion, and we’ll skip the obvious fact that Trevor Lawrence said nothing about Jesus or God in his on field interview immediately following the game.

First, if Coach Swinney were dead set on pleasing his quarterback, why did he wait until the fifth game of the season to start him?  Lawrence was a high school legend.  It seems the easier way to please him would be with playing time rather than fake faith.

Second, Coach Swinney seems to be the most genuine coach in college football, unless you count Les Miles who said, “Death Valley is where championship dreams come to die.”  The University of Kansas football program got ten times more interesting when they hired Les, but I digress.

Third, who’s to say that Trevor Lawrence couldn’t inspire his football coach to grow closer to God?  I’ve heard Tim Tebow had a positive effect on Urban Meyer.  Why couldn’t Trevor Lawrence have the same effect on Dabo?

How should we react when a coach, or an athlete gives credit to God after a championship win?  I’ll end this post with a few suggestions:

  1. We should evaluate what they’re saying.  Are they pointing to God as their leader, or are they pointing to God as their helper?  Are they acknowledging God for being great or are they telling us that God has made them great.  There’s a big difference.
  2. We should not be jealous.  Let’s face it guys, which one of us would not love to be standing on the podium hoisting the Lombardi trophy or that weird looking National Championship stick?  I like the crystal ball personally, but I hear Alabama broke it.  I’ll be honest.  I would love it, but God did not create me to coach college football.  If I were the head coach at Clemson, we would not be bowl eligible.  We might beat teams like Iowa and Oklahoma, but those would be our lone victories.
  3. We should cut them some slack for two reasons.  First, these guys have just come off winning a championship, and they are amped up.  Second, most of these guys are not seminary trained.  The rampant emotions and the shallow theological understanding combine to make for some uncomfortable statements.  Let’s cut them some slack and look beyond their post-game interviews to how their faith is expressed in their actions.  Many of these coaches and athletes are heavily involved in FCA, their churches, and other Christian organizations.  They’re making a lasting difference in their communities.  Their post-game statements will fade into obscurity, but the tangible impact they’re making on those around them will be their legacy.
  4. How do they react when they lose?  Tim Tebow, after his team lost the SEC Championship game to Alabama said, “to God be the glory”.  I’ve not heard how Tua (I can’t even begin to spell his last name) reacted, but I hope his faith is stronger than one lopsided defeat.  We should pay attention to how these athletes and coaches react when they’re on the wrong end of the score before we make a judgment about the authenticity of their faith.

We need athletes and coaches proclaiming the name of Christ.  They’re going to fail at times (cue the Hugh Freeze comments) but we should be pleased whenever Christ’s name is mentioned.  In Philippians, Paul was faced with those who had ulterior motives for proclaiming the name of Christ.  He responded, “To be sure, some preach Christ out of envy and rivalry, but others out of goodwill.  These preach out of love for the defense of the gospel; the others proclaim Christ out of selfish ambition, not sincerely, thinking that they will cause me trouble in my imprisonment.  What does it matter?  Only that in every way, whether from false motives or true, Christ is proclaimed, and in this I rejoice.  Yes, I will continue to rejoice.”  When we hear Christ’s name proclaimed, let’s rejoice.

Power of God – Resource for Sanctity of Human Life Sunday (1/20/19)

As we prepare for Sanctity of Human Life Sunday coming up in just a few weeks, I encourage you to make sure you’re incorporating that emphasis in your church’s worship service.

Here’s one resource I wanted to make you aware of. It’s a spoken word piece by a good friend, Nigel “Legin” Anderson. Legin is a Gospel rapper and record producer here in the Norfolk/Virginia Beach area. This spoken word, called “Power of God,” mentions various aspects of life’s brokenness and a specifically strong stance on abortion, and then heavily highlights the hope of the gospel to make all things whole.

Legin has offered the video for churches to show on January 20 for Sanctity of Human Life Sunday. Enjoy the video and consider if your church would benefit from seeing it in a few weeks.

You can find more of Legin’s music, podcasts, and ministry at rmmusic.tv/legin and linktr.ee/legintv. If you’d like to use Power of God for Sanctity of Human Life Sunday, you can download the file here (1080p, 1.09GB).

 

Related:
For Sanctity of Human Life Sunday, our ERLC has downloadable bulletin inserts available in addition to the Evangelicals for Life conference from January 16-18.

NAAF President Dr. Marshal L. Ausberry, Sr. Responds to SBTS Report on Slavery & Racism

As President of the National African American Fellowship of the Southern Baptist Convention, I commend Dr. R. Albert Mohler, Jr., President of The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. Dr. Mohler’s commissioning the study and releasing the internal report on the history of slavery and racism at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary is clear leadership akin to the men of Issachar. (1 Chronicles 12:32 (ESV) 32 Of Issachar, men who had understanding of the times, to know what Israel ought to do…) Dr. Mohler clearly understands the times and knows what to do!

I am sure that Dr. Mohler understands that he will face backlash in some corners. A leader does not stick his finger in the air to see which way the wind is blowing to make a decision. Instead, a true leader makes a decision knowing the right thing to do and does it!

The reporting of the study should not surprise anyone! The history is the history! The Mother seminary of the SBC marches in lockstep with the SBC. The history shows that the Seminary as an institution reflected the political and social culture of its time. It is perplexing how otherwise godly men could miss the mark so badly. But, when culture and politics have such an unmerited influence, the reaping is the result of what has been sewn. Southern Seminary is not by herself, many institutions of that era were swimming in the same river of prejudice, racism, and elitism cloaked in the sheets of the idea of manifest destiny.

My hope is that the release of the report will not cause dissension or divisiveness. I hope that the report will facilitate healing and a sober recognition of how far we have come as a people. While we still have ways to go, we truly have come a mighty long way! We needed this history to be documented, as stinging and troubling as it is, because as someone has said, “If we do not know our history, we are apt to repeat it!”

For Southern Baptists, we embrace the message of reconciliation. When we are wrong we don’t hide it, we admit it, and move not to repeat the past, but to make a better future! We must learn from the past. As brothers and sisters of every hue, we can be reconciled to one another because of Jesus Christ!

Jesus Christ is our great reconciler. We reconcile to each other because that is the picture of Christ reconciling a sinful world to Himself. Southern Baptists have a golden opportunity to show the world how we can make peace with our past, and truly love one another, because the love of Jesus Christ binds us together. The history of the Seminary is like an antibiotic and a vaccine. As an antibiotic it kills the lingering infection of racism and as a vaccine kills a recurrence of the disease!

We have the advantage of history because we can look back and wonder, “How did those otherwise godly men miss the mark so badly?” When we allow the culture and politics to become idols, we always miss the true interpretation of the Word of God!

Again, I commend Dr. Mohler for commissioning and releasing the report on the history of slavery and racism at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. I pray that it will be used for the betterment of the Southern Baptist Convention.

Dr. Marshal L. Asbury, Sr.
President, National African American Fellowship, SBC
December 15, 2018

Fort Worth Star Telegram Report on Sexual Abuse

The Forth Worth Star Telegram has published a four part series detailing a culture of sexual abuse within the Independent Fundamental Baptist Network.  The series was written by Sara Smith.  She reported on the Paige Patterson situation earlier this year, and, from my research, has been a leading journalist in exposing abuse in religious institutions and denominations.

If you have time, go read the series.  It is scary.  The Star Telegram interviewed over 200 people who were subjected to all kinds of abuse including rape, intimidation, and underage sex.  The perpetrators, in most cases, were never prosecuted, but were quickly shuffled to another church within the network.  This is not the Catholic church, these are our distant cousins and the accusations are coming closer and closer to home.  What should we do?  I have five suggestions:

  1. Pay attention:  The #metoo movement has impacted various personalities within our denomination, not our denomination as a whole.  that doesn’t mean our denomination has no secrets, or that a culture similar to the Fundamentalist Baptist Network cannot develop within our churches, conventions, and associations.  When I was a teenager, our church hired a pastor who had cheated on his wife at three different churches.  When he was discovered having an affair, he would shuffle off to the next church, rinse, and repeat.  We have to pay attention to this issue.  Satan would like nothing more than to catch us off guard.
  2. Be on Guard:  I was reading the report and was amazed at how many of the perpetrators and their enablers were allowed private audiences with underage female church members.  We cannot take that risk.  I know pastors who continue to meet alone with females.  That is never wise, and in today’s culture it’s foolish.  How many stories like this do we need to read before we stop putting ourselves in compromising positions.  We make Satan’s work easy when we take foolish risks.  If you’ve been meeting alone with a female who is not your wife or a family member, cut it out.
  3. Update our policies:  I have a friend who led his church in updating all of their policies concerning sexual abuse allegations.  He also updated various counseling policies for his own protection.  He has set the example for me, and in 2019, I’m going to lead our church to update our policies.  Updating our policies facilitates discussion amongst the rank and file in our pews.  They also protect the accuser, giving them a safe process and outlet to share their accusations, and they protect the accused against false accusations.  We need to update our policies because discussion brings accountability, gets things out in the open, and puts this issue on the radar.  The overwhelming issue with The Fundamentalist Baptist Network, according to the Star-Telegram, is a lack of accountability and a culture of intimidation and silence.
  4. Listen:  When we hear an accusation, we need to listen and take the accuser seriously.  That doesn’t mean we jump to convicting the accused, but The Star Telegram gives details of a shaming culture.  the accusers were shamed into silence, and in several cases, the Bible was used to shame these accusers.
  5. Stay away from the Pedestal: The Fundamentalist Baptists have a pedestal for their pastors.  Their pastors, according to the Star-Telegram report, are seen as next to God.  The wield unquestionable authority. We cannot put our leaders on a pedestal.  I appreciate Dave Miller’s series on criticism.  Earlier this year, our denomination experienced what happens when one of our leaders falls off his pedestal.  We should always feel free to Biblically criticize our leaders.
  6. Communicate:  The Star-Telegram reports a culture of sweeping accusations under the rug, and transferring accused ministers out of state to other churches, often in the same ministry positions, given alleged perpetrators access to underage girls and children.  This can happen in our denomination as well.  It probably has happened.  For example:  a youth minister is accused of improper conduct with one of the youth.  The pastor is informed.  The pastor speaks with the youth minister and determines the accusations are false, but he advises the youth minister to resign.  The pastor, not wanting to ruin the ministry of a dynamic youth minister, recommends him to another church as their youth minister.  Or worse yet, the pastor calls the authorities, and they find the accusations credible, but the youth and her parents do not press charges and the pastor, not wanting to ruin the ministry of a dynamic youth minister, recommends him to another church as their youth minister, and the cycle begins again.  How can we stop this?  There should be a denomination wide group, organization, database where churches report and receive reports about verified incidents of sexual misconduct.  Yes, I said verified, not alleged or rumors.  there has to be something we can do to better communicate with each other.

This report scared me because it had the word Baptist in it.  If you think this kind of culture does not exist in our own denomination, you have your head in the sand.  It exists in our denomination.  It may not be as wide spread as in the Fundamentalist Baptist Network, but it is there.  Sara Smith, and other journalists like her are doing an outstanding investigative job.  They are uncovering a culture of sin, and holding our leaders accountable.  This report and others like it should serve as a warning to us.